News|​TV|​Freeview|​Freesat|​Maps|​Radio|​Help 
Freeview: Freeview reception - all about aerials | Installing
My UK Free TV settings
For an enhanced Freeview reception
prediction please enter your
full postcode, a national grid reference or
a UK latitude and longitude pair.
 
Most popular LIVE 10:04
Live updates LIVE 10:04
Zeitgeist|Faults/Engineering|Box updates
Barskeoch Hill
TV Off Air from 06:13 today, HD ...
Hemdean
DAB: BBC National DAB Radio Off A...
New Galloway
TV Off Air from 06:13 today, HD ...
Tacolneston
Freeview: HD Digital TV Weak Sign...
UK Free IconMap of transmitters with faults or engineering
William Hepburn Worldwide Tropospheric Ducting Forecasts Atmosphere interference maps
Twitter LIVE 10:04

Briantist: Andrew Purcell has posted This is brilliant I Have been trying to establish for some time the I will http://t.co/6LlH7z0LKz @mookigoose
Briantist: Jackson G has posted Apologies for long response time we've had Internet problems to add to The list http://t.co/rU80tFDGC7 @pauleec
Briantist: Mary Manley has posted Both my DAB radios have lost Radio Leeds One is new and both are working otherwise any I http://t.co/DNFNp6VjFC
Briantist: Michael has posted On a Sky HD Box is a recording of http://t.co/bVg4uLNkgM @2014prmedia @mckaysinead @messerstanton @pepperandspot @mosh
Briantist: MikeB has posted Daniel A postcode would have a http://t.co/XigvoabnAp @nobleck1 @shaunsouthall @tallandrew @flippertygibble @yahoo.co.uk
Briantist: Daniel has posted I live in rushdan http://t.co/CrTRbMk7JY @nobleck1 @shaunsouthall @tallandrew @flippertygibble @yahoo.co.uk
Briantist: MikeB has posted Daniel You haven't with a http://t.co/8ArKvfhvoV @nobleck1 @shaunsouthall @tallandrew @flippertygibble @yahoo.co.uk
Briantist: KMJ Derby has posted henry mcallister No BT Sport is a subscription channel so requires a Sky box fitted with a a http://t.co/AbywHqP3Yg
Briantist: Daniel has posted Hello for the last 5 days my http://t.co/Tewf4uEMvg @nobleck1 @shaunsouthall @tallandrew @flippertygibble @yahoo.co.uk
Briantist: Robert Smeaton has posted I live in post code http://t.co/pImPlVORJR @maggiemay2149 @burtonstewart @trevordobie @nathaliemac @gwhroberts

Click here to follow Briantist on Twitter

Freeview reception - all about aerials

Your ability to receive all the Freeview transmissions depends on the suitability of aerial: the design style, "group" and its physical location.

Your ability to receive all the Freeview transmissions depends
Published on by on UK Free TV

Updated 8th January 2014.

Your ability of receive all the Freeview transmissions depends on the suitability of aerial

  • the design style,
  • the "group", and
  • its physical location.

Standard type - Yagi aerial



The standard type of TV aerial is known as the Yagi aerial. It is mounted on a pole, and consists of a rod with a reflector (shown green) at the back and many spiky elements (in grey) at the front. The connecting cable connects to the element nearest the reflector, known as the driver (shown in blue).

These Yagi aerials are directional and so pick up signals best from a transmitter that the rod points towards. The more elements the aerial has, the better it picks up a signal and becomes more directional.

A standard-type aerial is all that is required for digital TV reception in most places. These antennae have between 10 and 18 elements and a single reflector. These are recommended for new installations for good digital television reception, but will more often than not function perfectly in good reception areas.

Typically these aerials are designed to receive only some transmission frequencies - see "groups" below.

High Gain aerials



These aerials are designed for poor digital reception areas, and have two reflectors. For maximum signal strength, some digital high gain aerials have up to 100 elements. Since the switchover to digital-only transmissions back in October 2012, most UK households now have good quality digital TV signals.

A more expensive aerial is only required where the signal strength is low, but can often provide the whole Freeview reception where it might otherwise be impossible.

The CAI (that represents aerial installers) has four standards for digital TV aerials. The highest standard "1" is for homes on the fringes of coverage areas, intermediate standard "2" is suitable for use within the coverage area; minimum standard "3" is for good coverage conditions.

These aerials can be either wideband, or receive only selected frequencies - see "groups" below.

Grid



You may haved used a 'Grid aerial' for analogue reception, but as they are generally unsuitable for Freeview reception, they have now generally been replaced by the Yagi type. However in some places a Grid aerial installation may work for Freeview: otherwise replace with a standard Yagi aerial.

Indoor

Indoor aerials are generally not suitable for Freeview reception. In areas of good signal strength it is often possible to receive some transmissions. Even where an aerial works, people often find that may get interruptions to their viewing (or recording).

Loft mounted

Loft mounted arrivals are not generally recommended for Freeview reception, as the roof tiles and plumbing will degrade the signal. Some compensation for this loss of signal can be made by using satellite-grade cable to connect the set top box to the aerial.

Positioning

The best position for a TV aerial is mounted outdoors, as high from the ground as possible, pointing directly at the transmitter. The signal can be blocked by hills and tall buildings. It should be positioned away from any other aerials.

Horizontal or vertical?

The transmitter will either use vertical mode which requires the elements of your aerial to be up-down, or horizontal mode which requires them to be level with the ground.

Groups

Both analogue and digital television is transmitted the same group of transmission frequencies (known as channel 21 through to 60). A coloured marking on the aerial shows the group.



To create the best possible analogue picture, TV transmissions from adjacent transmitters have been designated to several different groups of frequencies. By using an aerial that receives only the channels in the correct group, the analogue picture can be kept free from interference.

To receive Freeview transmissions from the same transmitter it has been sometimes necessary to use frequencies that are not part of the transmitter's normal group. When this has occurred, the aerial will need to be replaced with a "wideband" aerial (also known as group W) - one that covers every group.

As Ofcom is planning to move the TV frequencies again - perhaps as soon as 2018 - it may be wise to use a wideband aerial if you can to ensure you can keep viewing Freeview for many years to come.





Your comments: most recent posts are at the bottom


Your comments are always welcome. Please use the form below to add your thoughts or questions to this page. We will get back to you as soon as we can.




Please post a question, answer or commentUK Free TV is here to help people. If you are rude or disrespectful all of your posts will be deleted and you will be banned.







Privacy policy: UK Free Privacy policy.